Korean 101

Korean has two sets of numbers, namely native Korean numbers and Sino-Korean numbers (which are borrowed from Chinese). Both come in handy, but in a pinch the Sino-Korean series is more important to learn.

Sino-Korean Numbers

Sino-Korean numbers are used for amounts of currency, telephone numbers, the 24-hour clock and counting minutes. Remember that sip is pronounced "ship".


0
공 (gong)

일 (il)

이 (i)

삼 (sam)

사 (sa)

오 (o)

육 (yuk)

칠 (chil)

팔 (pal)

구 (gu)
10 
십 (sip)
11 
십일 (sipil)
12 
십이 (sipee)
13 
십삼 (sipsam)
14 
십사 (sipsa)
15 
십오 (sipo)
16 
십육 (sipyuk)
17 
십칠 (sipchil)
18 
십팔 (sippal)
19 
십구 (sipgu)
20 
이십 (isip)
21 
이십일 (isipil)
22 
이십이 (isipi)
23 
이십삼 (isipsam)
30 
삼십 (samsip)
40 
사십 (sasip)
50 
오십 (osip)
60 
육십 (yuksip)
70 
칠십 (chilsip)
80 
팔십 (palsip)
90 
구십 (gusip)
100 
백 (baek)
200 
이백 (ibaek)
300 
삼백 (sambaek)
1000 
천 (cheon)
2000 
이천 (icheon)
10000 
만 (man)
1,000,000 
백만 (baekman)
1,000,000,000 
십억 (sipeok)
1,000,000,000,000 
조 (jo)
number _____ (train, bus, etc.) 
_____ 번 (열차, 버스, etc.) (beon (yeolcha, beoseu, etc.)
half 
반 (ban)
less 
덜 (deol)
more 
더 (deo)

Native Korean Numbers

Native Korean numbers are used for hours and with counting words. There are a plethora of these, but the most useful ones are bun (분) for people, jang (장) for papers including tickets, and gae (개) for pretty much anything else (which is not always strictly correct, but will usually be understood). Note that for numbers 1,2,3,4,and 20 + 'counting words',the last letter is dropped: one person is hanbun, two tickets is tujang , three things is segae, four things is negae, twenty things is seumugae.



하나 (hana)

둘 (tul)

셋 (set)

넷 (net)

다섯 (taseot)

여섯 (yeoseot)

일곱 (ilgop)

여덟 (yeodeol)

아홉 (ahop)
10 
열 (yeol)
11 
열하나 (yeolhana)
20 
스물 (seumul)
30 
서른 (seoreun)
40 
마흔 (maheun)
50 
쉰 (swin)
60 
예순 (yesun)
70 
일흔 (ilheun)
80 
여든 (yeodeun)
90 
아흔 (aheun)


Numbers above 100 are always counted with Sino-Korean numbers.

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