Russian 101

Russian (Kazakhstan) Peace Corps Course

Russian Peace Corps CourseЗдравствуйте! This Russian course was developed by the U.S. Peace Corps for its volunteers going to Kazakhstan. It can be useful as a primer for learning the basics of the Russian language. You can listen and follow along to each lesson or download the whole course directly.

Download Full Course (PDF and Audio Files)

Lesson 1 – Introduction to Russian


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Today Russian is still spoken by the overwhelming majority of people in the former Soviet Union. It will be useful to learn a few phrases of courtesy, for example: to express initial greetings, to ask about well-being of others, to introduce oneself etc.

The Russian language belongs to the Slavic group of the Indo-European language family and is considered one of the most important world languages. Russian was the official state language of the Soviet Union. After the disintegration of the USSR, Russian remains the state language of Russia and it is still the language of about 200 million people, including 16 million in Kazakhstan. Although Kazakh is the state language of Kazakhstan, Russian is the predominant language spoken.

Russian belongs to the inflectional languages (i.e. languages in which words have endings). A Russian word can have many different forms, and therefore not every word encountered in a text can be found in dictionaries. Russian words that have endings are entered in the dictionaries in a definite form. The definite form for nouns is the Nominative case singular, for adjectives it is the Nominative case singular masculine, and for verbs – the infinitive. Adverbs, prepositions and conjunctions are invariable.

Characteristic features of the Russian language are:

· Genders of the nouns and adjectives (masculine, feminine or neuter)

· Declension of the nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and numerals

· Conjugation of the verbs

· Aspect of the verbs

· Absence of articles

· Shift of stress

The Russian alphabet is comprised of 33 letters.

Stress, in Russian, can fall on any syllable in a word. One word has only one stressed syllable which is longer than others. Usually, the stress is indicated in dictionaries.

Verbs: there are three tenses: the present, the past, and the future. All verbs also have an aspect – imperfect and perfect.

Most local people are delighted and flattered by foreigners who attempt to speak their language. Your efforts will be generously rewarded.

It will be useful to learn a few phrases of courtesy, for example: to express initial greetings, to ask about well-being of others, to introduce oneself etc.

Lesson 2 – Russian Alphabet


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Letter Sound Approximate in English Examples Transcription English Meaning
Аа ah like “a” in “bar” бар [bar] bar
Бб beh like “b” in “bat” босс [boss} boss
Вв veh like “v” in “voice” ванúль [vaNEE vanilla
Гг geh like “g” in “grant” грант [grant] grant
Дд deh like “d” in “day” да [dah] yes
Ее yeh like “ye” in “yes”2 écли [YESli] if
Ёё yo like “yo” in “yolk” 2 ёж [yosh] hedgehog
Жж zhe like “zh” in журнáл [zhoorN magazine
Зз zeh like “z” in “zone” зóна [ZOHna zone
Ии ee like “ee” in “meet”1 мир [meer] peace
Йй Short ee (ee kratkoe) like “y” in “boy” мой [moi] my
Кк kah like “k” in “karate” кáша [KAHsha porridge
Лл əly like “l” in “look” лук [look] onion
Мм em like “m” in “mask” мáска [MASka mask
Нн en like “n” in “not” 1 нос [nos] nose
Оо oh like “o” in “port”1 порт [port] port
Пп peh like “p” in “park” парк [park] park
Рр ər like “r” in “rock” рот [rot] mouth
Сс əs like “s” in “sport” спорт [sport] sport
Тт təh like “t” in “tie” там [tam] there
Уу oo like“oo” in “soon” суп [soop] soup
Фф əf like “f” in “five” фáнта [FANta] Fanta
Хх kha like “h” in “hobby”” хóбби [HOhbi hobby
Цц tsəh like “ts” in “cats” центр [tsentr] center
Чч cheh like “ch” in “chair” час [chas] hour
Шш shah like “sh” in “shorts” шóрты [SHORt shorts
Щщ shchyah like “shch” in “rash choice” щи [scheeh cabbage soup
ъ hard sign (tvyordy znak) Indicates preceding hardness of consonant, transcription [:]; mark which separates a hard consonant from a soft vowel within a word. отъéзд [at:YES T] departure
ы i [hard} like “i” in “till” ты, вы [tyh, you
ь soft sign (myakhkii znak) Indicates softness of preceding consonant (transcription [y]) мать, пальтó [maty], [palyTO H] mother, overcoat
Ээ ə like “a” in “and” это [ƏHtah] this (is)
Юю yu like “yu” in “union” юмор [YOUHm humor
Яя ya like “ya” in “yard’ я [ya] I

Lesson 3 Part 1 – Greetings


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Dialogue 1

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak dihLAh]
B: – Very well, thanks. – Спасúбо¸ óчень хорошó. [spaSEEbah, Ochiny haraSHOH]

Dialogue 2

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak diLAH]
B: – Fine. – Хорошó! /Прекрáсно! [haraSHOH / prikRASnah]
And you? А у Вас? [A oo VAS]
A: – Well, thanks. – Спасúбо¸ хорошó. [spahSEEbah, haraSHOH]

Dialogue 3

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak diLAH]
B. – It’s OK. And you? – Нормáльно! А у Вас? [narMALynah /A oo VAS]
A: – Well, thanks. – Спасúбо¸ хорошó. [spahSEEbah, haraSHOh]

Dialogue 4

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak dihLAH]
B. – It’s OK, not bad. – Ничегó. [nihcnihVOH]

Dialogue 5

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak dihLAH]
B. – So-so. – Тáк себé! [tak siByEH]
A: – What happened? – Что случúлось? [shto slooCHEElasy]
B: – I am very tired. –  Я óчень устáла (female). [ya OOchiny oosTAhlah]

Dialogue 6

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooiti]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooiti]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak dihLAH]
B. – So-so. – Тáк себé! [tak siByE]
A: – What happened? – Что случúлось? [shto slooCHEElasy]
B: – I am very tired. – Я óчень устáл (male). [ya OOchiny oosTAL]

Dialogue 7

English Russian  
A: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
B: – Hello! – Здрáвствуйте! [ZDRASTvooitih]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak dihLAH]
B. – Bad. – Плóхо! [PLOha]
A: – What happened? – Что случилось? [shto slooCHEElasy]
B: – I feel bad. –  Я плóхо себя чýвствую. [ya PLOhah siByA CHOOSTvuyu]

Lesson 3 Part 2 – More Greetings


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Boys and girls of the same age use only the first name when they talk to each other. When they greet each other they use [ZDRASTvui].
English Russian  
A: – Hello, Dimitri! – Здрáвствуй, Димúтрий! [ZDRASTvooi Dimitri]
B: – Hello, Lena! – Здрáвствуй, Лéна! [ZDRASTvooi LyEHna]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как делá? [kak diLAH]
B: – It’s OK. And you? – Нормáльно! А у тебя? [narMALynah / a OO tihBYA]
A: – It’s OK. – Нормáльно! [narMALynah]
2. When a young person greets a group of boys and girls or an adult s/he uses the word [ZDRASTvuitih].
3.   If you are addressing a person older than you or any adults, then use that person’s first name and patronymic. Remember that a foreigner addressing a local person for the first time should use this form, unless greeting a young child. Locals do not use patronymic when addressing a foreigner, since most foreign first names would form rather strange-sounding patronymics.
English Russian  
A: – Hello, Dimitri Dimitrievich! – Здрáвствуйте, Димúтрий Димúтриевич! [ZDRASTvooitih diMEETriivich]
B: – Hello, Yelena Mikhailovna! –  Здрáвствуйте, Елéна Михáйловна! [ZDRASTvooitih yeLyEhna Mikhailovna]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как Вáши делá? [kak VAGshee diLAH]
B: – Thanks, it’s OK. And you? – Спасúбо, нормáльно, а у Вас? [spahSEEbah / narMALynah / a OO vas]
A: – Well, thanks. – Спасúбо¸ хорошó. [spahSEEbah, haraSHOh]
4. The greetings that are given below are the same whether you greet adults or children:
English Russian  
A. – Good morning! – Дóброе ýтро! [DOBraye OOTra]
B. – Good morning! – Дóброе ýтро! [DOBraye OOTra]
A. – Good morning! – Дóброе ýтро! [DOBraye OOTra]
B. – Good morning! – Дóброе ýтро! [DOBraye OOTra]
A. – Good afternoon! – Дóбрый день! [DOBry dyeny]
B. – Good afternoon! – Дóбрый день! [DOBry dyeny]
A. – Good afternoon! – Дóбрый день! [DOBry dyeny]
B. – Good afternoon! – Дóбрый день! [DOBry dyeny]
A. – Good evening! – Дóбрый вéчер! [DOBry VyEchir]
B. – Good evening! – Дóбрый вéчер! [DOBry VyEchir]
A. – Good evening! – Дóбрый вéчер! [DOBry VyEchir]
B. – Good evening! – Дóбрый вéчер! [DOBry VyEchir]
5. ‘Good night!’ is: ‘Спокóйной нóчи’ [spaKOInai NOchi]
English Russian  
A: – Good night! – Спокóйной нóчи! [spaKOInai NOchi]
B: – Good night! – Спокóйной нóчи! [spaKOInai NOchi]
6. До свидáния (literally “Until our meeting”) is used by both adults and children when saying goodbye to one or more person.
English Russian  
A: – Hello, Dimitri Dimitrievich! – Здрáвствуй, Димúтрий Димúтриевич! [ZDRASTvooitih Dimitri diMEETriivich]
B: – Hello, Yelena Mikhailovna! – Здрáвствуйте, Елéна Михáйловна! [ZDRASTvooitih yeLyEhna Mokhailovna]
A: – How are you (doing)? – Как Вáши делá? [kak VAGshee diLAH]
B: – Thanks, it’s OK. And you? – Спасúбо, нормáльно, а у Вас? [spahSEEbah / narMALynah / a OO vas]
A: – Well, thanks. – Спасúбо¸ хорошó. [spahSEEbah, haraSHOh]
B: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]
A: – Good bye. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]
Note: “Всегó хорóшего” [fsihVOH haROshihvah] and “До свидáния” [dasvihDAHniya] are used more or less interchangeably in saying “Good bye.”

A

English Russian  
A: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]
B: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]

B

English Russian  
A: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]
B: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]

C

English Russian  
A: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]
B: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]

D

English Russian  
A: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]
B: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]

E

English Russian  
A: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]
B: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]

F

English Russian  
A: – Good bye./All the best. – Всегó хорóшего. [fsihVOH haROshihvah]
B: – Good bye. – До свидáния. [dasvihDAHniya]
7. And more:
English Russian  
See you (informal). Увúдимся! [ooVEEdimsya]
See you (informal). Дo скóрого! [dasKOrava / paKA]
See you later. Дo встрéчи! [dafstRYEchih]
See you later. Дo скóрой встрéчи! [daSKOrai fstRYEchih]
See you tomorrow. До зáвтра! [daZAFTrah]
8. There two more forms, such as Hi ‘Привéт!’ [priVyET] and Bye ‘Пока!’ [pahKAH]
English Russian  
A: – Hi, Dimitri! –  Привéт, Димúтрий! [priVyET Dimitri]
B: – Hi, Lena! –  Привéт, Лéна! [priVyET LyEHna]
A: – How are you (doing)? –  Как делá? [kak diLAH]
B: – It’s OK. And you? –  Нормáльно! А у тебя? [narMALynah / a OO tihBYA]
A: – It’s OK. –  Нормáльно! [narMALynah]
B: – Bye. – Пока! [pahKAH]
A: – Bye. – Пока! [pahKAH]
These forms are used only among very good acquaintances. A young person would never use these forms in speaking to an adult. If you want to avoid mistakes in greeting people or saying goodbye, use the forms that are acceptable in polite and formal relationships: [ZDRASTvuitih] and [dasvihDAHniya].

Lesson 4 – Talking About Yourself and Others


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A. How to ask people about themselves?

1.  You already know that adults and children are addressed in different ways. You must also ask adults and children for their names differently. A child or a teenager is asked Как тебя зовýт? [kak tihBYA zaVOOT?] which means “What is your name?”

2.  But an adults hears: Как Вас зовýт? [kak vas zaVOOT = kak vazzaVOOT] “What is your name?”

3. When you ask [kak tihBYA zaVOOT], local children usually give a first name. When you ask adults [kak vas zaVOOT], they will give a first name and patronymic.

4.  To learn the last name requires a second question: “Как твоя фамúлия?» [kak tvahYA fahMEElihya] (for children) or «Как Вáша фамилия» [kak VAHshah fahMEElihya] (for adults).
English Russian  
What is your name? (polite, formal) Как Вас зовýт? [kak vaz zaVOOT]
What is your name? (child, buddy) How old are you? (polite, formal) How old are you? (child, buddy) What do you do? Как тебя зовýт? Скóлько Вам лет? Скóлько тебé лет? Кто Вы по профéссии? [kak tihBYA zaVOOT] [SKOLyka vam lyet] [SKOLyka tiByE lyet] [Kto vy papraFyEsii]
What is your name? (polite, formal) Как Вас зовýт? [kak vaz zaVOOT]
What is your name? (child, buddy) Как тебя зовýт? [kak tihBYA zaVOOT]
How old are you? (polite, formal) Скóлько Вам лет? [SKOLyka vam lyet]
How old are you? (child, buddy) Скóлько тебé лет? [SKOLyka tiByE lyet]
What do you do? Кто Вы по профéссии? [Kto vy papraFyEsii]
B. How to say something about yourself?
English Russian  
My name is… Меня зовýт … . [miNyA zaVOOT]
I’m 25 years old. Мне 25 лет. [mnye DVAtsaty pyaty lyet]
I’m an American (for a man). Я америкáнец. [YA amiriKAnits]
I’m an American (for a woman). Я америкáнка. [YA amiriKANka]
I’m from America. Я из Амéрики. [YA izaMyEriki].
I’m a Peace Corps Volunteer. Я волонтёр Кóрпуса Мúра. [YA valanTyOR KORpoosa MEErah]
I’m a teacher of English. Я учúтель англúйского языкá [YA ooCHEEtily angLIIskahvah izyKAH]
C. How to ask people about themselves? How to say something about yourself?
English Russian  
A: – What is your name? (polite, formal) – Как Вас зовýт? [kak vaz zaVOOT]
B: – My name is … – Меня зовýт … . [miNyA zaVOOT ]
A: – How old are you? (polite, formal) – Скóлько Вам лет? [SKOLyka vam lyet]
B: – I’m 25 years old. – Мне 25 лет. [mnye DVAtsaty pyaty lyet]
A: – Where are you from? – Откýда Вы? [atKOOdah vy]
B: – I’m from America. – Я из Амéрики. [ya izaMyErikih].
A: – What are you doing? – Чем Вы занимáетесь? [chyem vy zaniMAHitisy]
B: – I’m Peace Corps Volunteer. – Я волонтёр Кóрпуса Мúра. [YA valanTyOR KORpoosa MEErah]
A: – What do you do? – Кто Вы по профéссии? [kto vy papraFyEsii]
B: – I’m a teacher of English. – Я учúтель англúйского языкá. [YA ooCHEEtily angLIIskahvah izyKAH]

Lesson 5 – Polite Phrases


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English Russian Pronunciation
Thank you. Спасúбо! [spahSEEHbah]
You are welcome. Пожáлуйста! [pahZHAloosta]
Thank you very much. Большóе спасúбо! [balySHOye spahSEEHbah]
That’s all right. Нé за что! [NyEHzashtah]
Excuse me. / Sorry. Простúте./Извинúте. [prasTEEtih / izvihNEEtih]
Yes. Да. [dah]
No. Нет. [nyet]
Please. Пожáлуйста. [pahZHAHloostah]
Good. Хорошó! [hahrahSHOH]

Lesson 6 – Agreeing and Disagreeing


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English Russian Pronunciation
Yes. Да. [dha]
No. Нет. [NyET]
I (don’t) agree (for a man). Я (не) соглáсен. [YA nisagLAsin]
I don’t agree (for a woman). Я (не) соглáсна. [YA nisagLASna]
You are right. Вы прáвы. [vy PRAvy]
You are wrong. Вы не прáвы. [vy niPRAvy]
That is true. Это прáвда. [əta PRAVda]
That is not true. Это непрáвда. [əta niPRAVda]

Lesson 7 – Language Abilities


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English Russian Pronunciation
Do you speak English? Вы говорúте по-англúйски? [vy gavaREEti paangLISki]
I don’t speak Russian. Я не говорю по-рýсски. [ya nigavaRyU paROOSki]
I don’t speak Russian well. Я плóхо говорю по-рýсски. [ya PLOha gavaRyU paROOSki]
Do you understand? (polite, plural) Вы понимáете? [vy paniMAitih]
Do you understand? (child, buddy) Ты понимáешь? [ty paniMAish]
I’m sorry. I don’t understand. Извинúте. Я не понимáю. [izviNEEtih, ya nipaniMAyu]
I’m a foreigner (for a man). Я инострáнец. [ya inastRAnits]
I’m a foreigner (for a woman). Я инострáнка. [ya inastRAnka]

Lesson 8 – Asking Questions


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English Russian Pronunciation
Can you please tell me… Скажúте, пожáлуйста, … [skaZHIti paZHAloosta]
Where is (are) … ? Где? [gdye]
Where is a bathroom? Где туалéт? [gdye tooaLyET]
Where (to) … ? Кудá? [kooDA]
Who? Кто? [kto]
Who’s that? Ктó это? [kto Ətah]
What? Что? [shto]
What’s that? Чтó это? [shto Ətah]
What does that mean? Что это знáчит? [shto Əta ZNAHchit]
When? Когдá? [kagDA]
How? Как? [kak]
Why? Почемý? [pachiMOO]
How much? / How many? Скóлько? [SKOLyka]
How much is it? Скóлько это стóит? [SKOLyka Əta STOit]
How much is it? Почём? [paCHOM]

Lesson 9 – More Questions


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Dialogue A

English Russian Pronunciation
Do you have … у Вас есть … [OO vas yesty…]
an iron? утюг [ooTyUk]
detergent? стирáльный порошóк [stiRALyny paraSHOK]
a washing machine? стирáльная машúна [stiRALynaya maSHEEHnah]
a lint brush? щётка для одéжды [SCHyOTkah dlya aDyEZHdy]
a needle? игóлка [iGOLkah]
a thread? нúтки [NEETkih]
scissors? нóжницы [NOZHnitsy]
hot water? горячая водá [gahRyAchiya vahDAH]

Dialogue B

English Russian Pronunciation
Where can I … Где мóжно … [gdye MOZHnah]
do laundry? постирáть? [pastiRATy]
iron? поглáдить? [pagLAdity]
take a shower? принять душ? [prihNyATydoosh]
wash myself помыться? [pahMYtsa]
Can I use your phone? Мóжно позвонúть? [MOZHnah pazvaNEETy’]

Lesson 10 – Can/May I?


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If you want to request/ask something or offer your assistance to someone, you can simply say:
English Russian Pronunciation
Can I / May I? Мóжно? [MOZHna]
The rest of the idea can be expressed by your eyes, your hands, or your actions.
English Russian Pronunciation
I can. Я могý. [ya maGOO]
I can’t. Я не могý. [ya nimaGOO]
Can you tell me… Скажúте, пожáлуйста… [skaZHEEtih paZHAloosta]
Can you help me… Помогúте мне, пожáлуйста! [pamaGEEti mnye paZHAloosta]
You can’t. Нельзя! [nilyZyA]

Lesson 11 – Expressing Yourself


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English Russian Pronunciation
I want … [ya haCHOO] Я хочý…
I want to sleep. [ya haCHOO spaty] Я хочý спать.
I don’t want. [ya nihaCHOO] Я не хочý…
I’m hungry. [ya haCHOO yesty] Я хочý есть.
I’m not hungry. [ya nihaCHOO yesty] Я не хочý есть.
I’m thirsty. [ya haCHOO peety] Я хочý пить.
I’m not thirsty. [ya nihaCHOO peety] Я не хочý пить.
I’m tired (for a man). [ya oosTAL] Я устáл.
I’m tired (for a woman). [ya oosTAla] Я устáла.
It’s important. [Əta VAZHnah] Это вáжно.
It’s urgent. [Əta SROCHnah] Это срóчно.

Lesson 12 – Food Preferences


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English Russian Pronunciation
It is very tasty. [Ochiny FKOOSnah] óчень вкýсно.
I don’t eat meat. [ya niYEM MyAHsah] Я не ем мясо.
I don’t eat fat. [ya niYEM ZHEERnava] Я не ем жúрного.
I don’t eat eggs. [ya niYEM YAItsah] Я не ем яйца.
I don’t drink (alcohol). [ya niPyYU] Я не пью.
I don’t drink milk. [ya niPyYU mahlahKOH] Я не пью молокó.
I’m a vegetarian. [ya vigitariAHnits] Я вегетариáнец (male).
I’m a vegetarian. [ya vigitariANkah] Я вегетариáнка (female).

Lesson 13 – A Knock on the Door


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English Russian Pronunciation
Who is that? Кто там? [kto tam]
Wait a minute please. Подождúте минýту, пожáлуйста. [padazhDEEtih miNOOtoo]
I’m coming. Я сейчáс. [YA siCHAs]
Come in. Войдúте. [vaiDEEti]

Lesson 14 – Numbers


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Number Russian Pronunciation
1 одúн [aDEEN]
2 два [dvah]
3 три [tree]
4 четыре [chihTYrih]
5 пять [pyaty]
6 шесть [shyesty]
7 семь [syemy]
8 вóсемь [VOHsimy]
9 дéвять [DyEvity]
10 дéсять [DyEsity]
11 одúннадцать [aDEEnatsaty]
12 двенáдцать [dviNAtsaty]
13 тринáдцать [triNAtsaty]
14 четырнадцать [chiTYRnatsaty]
15 пятнáдцать [pitNAtsaty]
16 шестнáдцать [shisNAtsaty]
17 семнáдцать [simNAtsaty]
18 восемнáдцать [vasimNAtsaty]
19 девятнáдцать [divitNAtsaty]
20 двáдцать [DVAtsaty]
21 двáдцать одúн [DVAtsaty aDEEN]
22 двáдцать два [DVAtsaty dva]
23 двáдцать три [DVAtsaty tree]
24 двáдцать четыре [DVAtsaty chihTYrih]
25 двáдцать пять [DVAtsaty pyaty]
26 двáдцать шесть [DVAtsaty shyesty]
27 двáдцать семь [DVAtsaty syemy]
28 двáдцать вóсемь [DVAtsaty VOsimy]
29 двáдцать дéвять [DVAtsaty DyEvity]
30 трúдцать [TREEtsaty]
10 дéсять [DyEsity]
20 двáдцать [DVAtsaty]
30 трúдцать [TREEtsaty]
40 сóрок [SOrak]
50 пятьдесят [pihdihSyAT]
100 сто [sto]
200 двести [DVyEStih]
300 триста [TREEStah]
400 четыреста [chihTYristah]
500 пятьсóт [piTySOT]
1000 тысяча [TYschah]
2000 две тысячи [dvye TYschih]
3000 три тысячи [tree TYschih]
4000 четыре тысячи [chihTYrih TYschih]
5000 пять тысяч [pyaty tysch]
60 шестьдесят [shizdihSyAT]
70 сéмьдесят [SyEMydisyat]
80 вóсемьдесят [VOsimydisyat]
90 девянóсто [diviNOSta]
100 сто [sto]
600 шестьсóт [shiSOT]
700 семьсóт [simySOT]
800 восемьсóт [vasimySOT]
900 девятьсóт [diviTSOT]
1000 тысяча [TYscha]
6000 шесть тысяч [shyesty tysch]
7000 семь тысяч [syemy tysch]
8000 вóсемь тысяч [Vosimy tysch]
9000 дéвять тысяч [DyEvity tysch]
10000 дéсять тысяч [DyEsity tysch]

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