Thai 101

now 
เดี๋ยวนี้ (dǐo níi)


later 
หลัง (lăng)
before 
ก่อน (kòn)
morning 
เช้า (cháo)
afternoon 
บ่าย (bàai)
evening 
เย็น (yen)
night 
คืน (khuen)

Clock

There are no less than three systems for telling time in Thailand.


The easiest of the three is 24-hour official clock, encountered primarily in bus and railway schedules. To create an official time, simply affix naalikaa นาฬิกา to the number of hours, so that e.g. kao naalikaa is 9 AM (0900) and sip-saam naalikaa is 1 PM (1300).


Things get a little more difficult in the 12-hour common clock. As in the West, the number of the hour runs from 1 to 12, but instead of just AM and PM, the day is divided into four sections (ตอน ton):

1. เช้า cháo (morning), from 6 AM to noon
2. บ่าย bàai (afternoon), from noon to 4 PM
3. เย็น yen (evening), from 4 PM to 6 PM
4. คืน khuen (night), from 6 PM to 11 PM


A 12-hour time is thus composed from the hour, the word mong โมง and the correct ton ตอน. As exceptions, the word bàai comes before mong (not after); 1 PM is just bàai moong with no number; and there are special words for noon and midnight. Some examples:


1
00 AM : ตีหนึ่ง (tii nueng')


2
00 AM : ตีสอง (tii sǒng)
3
00 AM : ตีสาม (tii säam)
4
00 AM : ตีสี่ (tii sìi)
5
00 AM : ตีห้า (tii hâ)
6
00 AM : หกโมงเช้า (hòk mong cháo)
7
00 AM : เจ็ดโมงเช้า (jèt mong cháo)
8
00 AM : แปดโมงเช้า (pàet mong cháo)
9
00 AM : เก้าโมงเช้า (kâo mong cháo)
10
00 AM : สิบโมงเช้า (sìp mong cháo)
11
00 AM : สิบเอ็ดโมงเช้า (sìp et mong cháo)
12 noon 
เที่ยง (thîang) or เที่ยงวัน (thîang wan)
1
00 PM : บ่ายโมง (bàai mong)
2
00 PM : บ่ายสองโมง (bàai sǒng mong)
3
00 PM : บ่ายสามโมง (bàai säam mong)
4
00 PM : สี่โมงเย็น (sìi mong yen')
5
00 PM : ห้าโมงเย็น (hâa mong yen')
6
00 PM : หกโมงเย็น (hòk' mong yen')
7
00 PM : หนึ่งทุ่ม (nueng' thum')
8
00 PM : สองทุ่ม (sǒng thum')
9
00 PM : สามทุ่ม (säam thum')
10
00 PM : สี่ทุ่ม (sìi thum')
11
00 PM : ห้าทุ่ม (hâ thum')
12
00 midnight : เที่ยงคืน (thîang khuen) or สองยาม (sǒng yaam)

Duration

_____ second(s) 
_____ วินาที (wí na-thii)


_____ minute(s) 
_____ นาที (na-thii)
_____ hour(s) 
_____ ชั่วโมง (chûa mong)
_____ day(s) 
_____ วัน (wan')
_____ week(s) 
_____ อาทิตย์ (aathít') or สัปดาห์ (sap-daa)
_____ month(s) 
_____ เดือน (duean)
_____ year(s) 
_____ ปี (pii)

Days

today 
วันนี้ (wanníi)


yesterday 
เมื่อวานนี้ (mûea wan níi) or เมื่อวาน (mûea waan)
tomorrow 
พรุ่งนี้ (phrûng níi)
this week 
อาทิตย์นี้ (aathít níi)
last week 
อาทิตย์ก่อน (aathít kòn)
next week 
อาทิตย์หน้า (aathít nâa)
Monday 
วันจันทร์ (wan jan)
Tuesday 
วันอังคาร (wan angkaan)
Wednesday 
วันพุธ (wan phut)
Thursday 
วันพฤหัสบดี (wan pharuehat)
Friday 
วันศุกร์ (wan suk)
Saturday 
วันเสาร์ (wan sao)
Sunday 
วันอาทิตย์ (wan aathit)

Months

All Thai months end in the suffix -kom (31 days) or -yon (30 days), except February's idiosyncratic -phan. In casual speech these are often omitted, but the word month (deuan) may be prefixed instead.


January 
มกราคม (makarakhom) or มกรา (makara)


February 
กุมภาพันธ์ (kumphaaphan) or กุมภา (kumphaa)
March 
มีนาคม (miinakhom) or มีนา (miina)
April 
เมษายน (mesayon) or เมษา (mesa)
May 
พฤษภาคม (pruetsaphakhom) or พฤษภา (pruetsapha)
June 
มิถุนายน (mithunayon) or มิถุนา (mithuna)
July 
กรกฎาคม (karakadaakhom) or กรกฎา (karakadaa)
August 
สิงหาคม (singhakhom) or สิงหา (singha)
September 
กันยายน (kanyaayon) or กันยา (kanyaa)
October 
ตุลาคม (tulaakhom) or ตุลา (tulaa)
November 
พฤศจิกายน (pruetsajikaayon) or พฤศจิกา (pruetsajikaa)
December 
ธันวาคม (thanwaakhom) or ธันวา (thanwaa)

Writing

Thais often use Buddhist Era (BE) พุทธศักราช (พ.ศ.) years, which runs 543 years ahead of the Western Calendar. 2549 BE is thus equivalent to 2006 AD.


Featured Video